Women tend to get the better sex, according to a new study by researchers at Oxford University.

The team, which included Dr. Kate H. Smith, an associate professor of sociology at the university, found that women tended to have more orgasms and orgasmic orgasms than men.

It was the first study to use a self-report questionnaire to measure sexual satisfaction and orgasm and to compare women and men.

In the study, which is published in the Journal of Sexual Medicine, researchers asked 827 women and 817 men to describe their experience with sexual activity.

They then surveyed the participants on how often they had orgasms, how often orgasmic sex occurred, how they rated their orgasms on a five-point scale, and how often sex occurred without them having an orgasm.

They also asked how often women reported that sex with a partner involved orgasms.

Hans H. Boesch, professor of psychology and psychiatry at the University of Gothenburg, led the study.

He noted that men tend to prefer to have sex with other men, which helps explain why men are more likely to have orgasmic orgasmic activity.

“Men are more interested in sex, because they’re less likely to go through life alone, they tend to want a partner to help them out and they tend not to want to be alone and be able to be intimate with their partner.

So it’s more likely that they’ll have orgasms,” Boesc told ESPN.

“Women, in comparison, are much more interested to have sexual activity with a mate and they’re much less likely than men to report that they have an orgasmic encounter.”

Women were more likely than the men to rate their orgasms as frequent and intense, which can be associated with increased arousal.

However, women tended not to report having orgasmic experiences, Boesck said.

This means that while women were more than twice as likely as men to say they had orgasmic encounters, they were less likely overall to report an orgasm, than men, who were more accurate.

“It’s interesting that women tend to report orgasmes, whereas men do not.

And it’s not a difference between men and women, but women are more attuned to orgasming, whereas they’re not attuned as much to the orgasm,” Biesch said.”

We’ve found that sexual activity is associated with a lot of different things, and it’s interesting to see that this association is there even among women.

We don’t know why, and we don’t really understand why.”

Hollie Coyle, a clinical psychologist who was not involved in the study but has researched orgasm and orgasm satisfaction for many years, said the results may explain why some women report more orgasmey encounters than men are comfortable with.

“The results are very interesting and, in terms of women, very intriguing, as we know that women are very prone to experiencing orgasmic discomfort, and men are quite sensitive to that as well,” she said.

Hollis is a co-author of the new study, with other Oxford researchers, including Professor Matthew W. Paddon, a professor of gender studies at the School of Psychology at the U.K.’s University of Cambridge.