Female sex workers have long had to choose between using condoms and having sex.

But a new study has found that condoms are far more effective for female sex workers, as well as those who are not used to being tested.

A new study by researchers at the University of Montreal and the University Hospitals of Grenoble and Marseille, France, found that women who had been tested using a condom were able to successfully abstain from sex for longer periods of time.

They reported their findings online in the journal PLOS ONE.

In addition, the study found that men who used condoms were more likely to have a condom failure, as opposed to those who didn’t.

And while condom use was associated with reduced risk of HIV infection among male sex workers and non-sex workers, it did not appear to be associated with increased risk of transmission to women.

The study was based on data from the International HIV/AIDS Study, a large, ongoing study of male sex work in France.

More than 2,000 men and women ages 25 to 69 were included in the study.

Participants were asked whether they had ever used a condom and their partner’s HIV status, which includes HIV-1 and HIV-2 status, during the previous two weeks.

The researchers also asked participants to rate their own condom effectiveness and their condom failure rates.

The condom use rate varied across groups.

Among the participants who were HIV-positive, condoms were found to be more effective than condoms against transmission to female sex worker groups.

In the non-infected group, condom use ranged from 0.5% to 4%.

In the HIV-negative group, condoms ranged from 5% to 13%.

“The results showed that condoms were equally effective as a tool for male sex worker protection, even among men who had not been tested, and that they could have an even greater impact in reducing transmission risk to women,” lead researcher Julie Bouchard, a professor of epidemiology and HIV prevention at the university, told Newsweek.

“The study is the first to show condom use and condom failure as predictors of HIV transmission among female sex work.”

In a previous study, Bouchards team found that condom use among male workers was linked to HIV infection and lower condom use in the HIV positive group.

Bouchart said her team wanted to find out if the findings were applicable to female workers, which they did.

In her new study, researchers followed 2,800 female sex-workers in France over the course of two years.

In total, about 13% of the participants were HIV positive and about 40% were HIV negative.

Participants who were tested using condoms were also able to abstain for longer than those who weren’t.

The data showed that, among female workers who had tested positive, condom failure was associated less with HIV infection than among those who had received no HIV testing, Boughard said.

The results were significant, Broughard said, because they showed that condom failure and condom use were linked with HIV transmission rates in a non-randomized study.

“We found that the risk of being HIV positive was reduced by about 30%, even among people who were not infected,” Broughards team said.

“And among the HIV negative participants, there was a significant reduction of HIV transmissions among condoms and condom failures.”

The researchers used a number of methods to calculate condom failure rate.

For example, they calculated condom failure by comparing the number of condoms used per 100 participants, which is a measure of condom effectiveness.

For each condom used, they looked at the total number of days condom use could have been expected to last.

They also compared condom failure with the condom failure of those who did not have condoms, to see how many days condom failure would have been if all condoms had been used.

They then looked at condom failure between the same time periods and found that failure rates increased for the first six days after condoms were used.

“Our study indicates that condoms and failure rates are linked,” Bouchas team said in a statement.

“This finding supports condom use as a way to reduce HIV transmission, even for those who have not tested.”

The findings also suggest that male sex-worker use could be reduced through a combination of condom use, condom failures and condoms, according to the researchers.

They said their findings suggest that condoms can have a protective effect in preventing HIV transmission for male workers.

“Male sex workers need to use condoms, which are more effective and more cost-effective than condoms for their protection,” said lead researcher Christophe Delafour, a postdoctoral researcher in the UHG and a PhD student in the department of epidemiological studies.

“Carrying condoms is a risk factor for HIV, and the study shows that condoms reduce HIV risk for male HIV-infection patients.”

The results of the study are based on the data of 7,854 male sex industry workers in France, who had sex between 2006